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Tuesday
Apr102012

Asking Yandex In Ukrainian 

The following is a map of Ukraine showing the number (in percentages) of searches made on Yandex in the Ukrainian language across Ukraine in Autumn 2010...  

Source

It reminds me a bit of this graph from a survey conducted by Gallup in 2008 which I have posted about here. I repost the chart below:

Unlike most surveys which ask people which language they consider to be their native, the above charts measure the actual language use in the population. An interesting method indeed, these charts show that the vast majority of people in Ukraine give preference to Russian.

For those who know Russian, I suggest you read this. 

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Reader Comments (13)

Could the possible reason be that most business in Ukraine is still conducted in Russian...gee I wonder why??.....(it couldn't be due to centuries of russification though...because the russification of the Ukrainian language and culture by Russian processes never occured. The Ukrainain language was wittingly hoisted upon unweary Ukrainian peasants by Polonised Ukrainians , who all along spoke a language where the 'popular vernaculars were too Russian sounding ') :-) :-)

@ Hack

Where is that ancient Ukrainian language I wonder? What kind of language did Pylyp Orlyk write in? Or Gregoriy Skovoroda? What is the language of Istoriya Rusov? Not to mention Gogol's novels.

Popular vernaculars are still more Russian sounding to be honest, they are called Surzhyk. Hetman Skoropadsky spoke Surzhyk, so did Taras Shevchenko. Maybe one should accept that so called Ukrainian is an invention which was forced upon Ukrainians by Stalin and Kaganovych. But that's hard...

April 11, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Leos - you're so full of it it and your understanding of Russian and Ukrainian history is so very far off it aint even funny! You're beginning to sound more and more like a broken record that was produced in the 1950's in the basement of the Lubyanka prison, by the sovoks you try to distance yourself from. Why even try??......

@ Hack

Why don't you read Pylyp Orlyk and Skovoroda in original instead of calling me a sovok? :-)

April 11, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Why don't you substantiate your recent previously stated assinine theoory regarding the formation of the Ukrainian language:

''the literary Ukrainian language is a modern invention, with a HEAVY Polish element that was concocted to: ' counter the fact that the popular vernaculars were too Russian sounding.'

Or are you now wisely backing paying off from your previously formulated ideas?? So far, you've only managed to stumble upon the fact that the literary Russian language was developed earlier than the Ukrainian literary language, and somehow think that you've uncovered some dividend paying fact to your outdated, half baked theories......:-)

@ Hack

That literary Russian language was developed earlier, and by Little Russians among others. Ask yourself, how did it happen that Pylyp Orlyk used April' instead of kviten'? Because Pylyp Orlyk did not imagine Ukrainian language even in his wildest dreams. I can substantiate my theory of polonisation for the sake of de-russification easily. Read this:

"Следует также отметить, что множество полонизмов было введено в наш язык искусственно, умышленно, с единственной целью углубить разницу между украинским и русским языками. Из множества таких слов для примера возьмем одно: "гyма" (резина). Резина была создана в те времена, когда Украина давно уже вернулась в лоно единого общерусского государства, следовательно, новое, во всех отношениях полезное вещество и в русском, и в украинском языках должно было называться одним и тем же словом "резина". Спрашивается, каким же образом резина стала называться по-украински точно так же, как и по-польски - гума (guma)? Ответ ясен: в результате целенаправленной, умышленной политики ополячивания под фальшивым названием "дерусификация". Таких примеров есть немало.

Примечательно, что процесс "дерусификации" в наши дни вспыхнул с новой силой. Буквально ежедневно украинские средства массовой информации вместо привычных, укоренившихся слов преподносят нам новые, якобы исконно украинские: "спортовець" вместо спортсмен, "поліціянт" вместо поліцейський, "агенція" вместо агентство, "наклад" вместо тираж, "уболівати" вместо спортивного боліти, "розвой" вместо розвиток - всего и не перечислить! Разумеется, все эти "украинские" слова взяты непосредственно из польского языка: sportowjec, policiant, agencia, naklad, uboliwac, rozwoj? Таким образом, должно быть ясно, что у нас на Украине понятия "дерусификация" и "ополячивание" - синонимы."

http://russian.kiev.ua/books/zheleznyj/pdu2/pdu2_8.shtml

I am sure I do not have to translate that for you.

April 11, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Absolutely brilliant...Pylyp Orlyk chose to use 'April' instead of 'kviten'...

You've now completely substantiated your half-witted theory, Leos! :-)

@ Hack

Pylyp Orlyk, like Skorovoda wrote in a language similar to Russian more than contemporary Ukrainian, they did not know what the hell Ukrainian is. But that is not the only part of my argument above, read the Russian text. Before you come up with a substantiated reaction to what I wrote, I consider this conversation to be over!

April 11, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

'I consider this conversation to be over!'

You remind me of another russophile heroe of the 20th century, who made his mark by taking off his shoe and slamming it on the table at the UN, when he too had had enough.....:-) :-) :-)

'Pylyp Orlyk, like Skorovoda wrote in a language similar to Russian more than contemporary Ukrainian, they did not know what the hell Ukrainian is'

Pylyp Orlyk was actually the last of a long line of Ukrainian hetmans, who worked tirelessly in the diaspora of western Europe for Ukrainian national rights. It's hilarious that you would try to even use him to help substantiate your dimwitted theories!! :-) :-) :-)

@ Hack

I am not talking about Orlyk's work in Western Europe. Although your beliefs that he was working for Ukrainian national rights are rather laughable. He refereed to his homeland as Little Russia and his people as Little Russians by the way, and he wanted himself and his followers to be the rulers of Little Russia. That means he wanted rights for nobility, not national rights. Nationalism is a more modern concept, and Ukrainian nationalism is several centuries removed from Orlyk.

But really, my point was not about what Orlyk wanted, but about what language he used to convey his wishes in. I see you have problems understanding key issues here. So when that gopak in your head ends, come back here, and try reacting to what I wrote. And you might also react to that Russian text above which you seem to conveniently avoid.

On my part, this conversation is over, but thanks for that little comical moment about Orlyk. :-)

April 11, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

'and Ukrainian nationalism is several centuries removed from Orlyk.'

And Russian nationalism no doubt predated Orlyk by several centuries (as you no doubt believe!) :-) :-) :-)

Maybe I'll reappear once you've posted the promised piece that no doubt will prove to be your comical Magnum Opus:

'''the literary Ukrainian language is a modern invention, with a HEAVY Polish element that was concocted to: ' counter the fact that the popular vernaculars were too Russian sounding.' :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)

Interesting data. Thanks Leos,

April 12, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterAlexander Mercouris

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