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Sunday
Aug122012

Russian Emigration On Ukrainisation 

Source

The page above comes from a Russian emigrant newspaper named "Ilusrirovannaya Rossiya", published: 23 April1927 in Paris. Below is my translation of what it says. The letters are small and the text uses old typography, I am glad my eyesight still works well, but at least one word I could not read...

***

Persecution of Russians in Ukraine

Purge of Russian elements in state institutions

Unrelenting peasant unrest in Ukraine makes the Soviet government very worried. Along the way, having power as their goal, the Bolsheviks seek support among fringe Ukrainian nationalist circles. All Russians serving in state institutions, [and] not knowing Ukrainian, are immediately sacked. Knowledge of the Ukrainian language is checked by a particular committee, to which belong representatives of the National Commissariat for Enlightenment, Local Professional Union Committee, and Communist Cells, and a representative [tasked with] Ukrainisation (... -unintelligible) institution. Our photo depicts a scene from an examination in one Soviet institution in Khar'kov. On the left, by the telephone, sits the examiner.

***

While my favourite Dr. Motyl would have you believe that there was a time when Ukrainian was only tolerated in concentration camps:

Ukrainian identity is no longer something tolerated only in concentration camps. 

...once again we see that the truth is the exact opposite to Motyl's wild claims. The Soviet government actively supported and promoted Ukrainian identity, even at the expense of repressing the Russian element. Of course Motyl, being a Russophobe that he is, does not care one bit about the repression of the Russian element, he instead presents a fantasy world where Ukrainian identity was only tolerated in concentration camps.   

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Reader Comments (13)

Nobody is denying that there was an approximate 15 year period know as 'korenizatisya' used to help enlist the support of the local populace to the bolshevik cause...'harmonizing the relationship between the Soviet regime and the population by carrying the national and ethnic policies that would appeal to the wide masses of the local people in the ethnically non-Russian areas.' A pretty smart move by a new regime that really didn't have deep roots in Ukraine (bolshevism was imported militarily from the Russian north).

What Leos is loathe to mention is that by the mid 1930's korenizatsiya was replaced more and more by a pronounced policy of russification that culminated in the 1970's during Brezhnev's reign when he promulgated the '50 year anniversary of the Soviet Union' where it was announced the creation of a new 'Soviet nationality' where the official language was to be Russian (thus the often satirical references to 'homo-sovieticus').

'Between 1933 and 1938 there was a series of purges of the leaderships of the national republics and territories. The charge against the nationals was that they had instigated national strife and oppressed the Russians or other minorities in the republics. In 1937 it was proclaimed that the local elites had become hired agents and their goal had become dismemberment of the Soviet Union and the restoration of capitalism. Now it was time to see that the Russians got fair treatment. National leaderships of the republics and autonomies were liquidated en masse...
From 1937 the central press started to praise Russian language and Russian culture. Mass campaigns were organized to denounce the "enemies of the people". "Bourgeois nationalists" were new enemies of the Russian people which had suppressed the Russian language. The policy of indigenization was abandoned. In the following years the Russian language became a compulsory subject in all Soviet schools.
The pre-revolution Russian nationalism was also rehabilitated. Many of the heroes of Russian history were glorified. The Russian people became the "elder brother" of the "Socialist family of nations". A new kind of patriotism, Soviet patriotism, was declared to mean a willingness to fight for the Socialist fatherland. In 1938 Russian became a mandatory subject of study in all non-Russian schools.' http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korenizatsiya

You see Leos, maybe you've not been giving the commies enough respect? Seeing the error in their original approach, they reversed themselves and slowly but surely put forth an intense program of russification. Perhaps, it's not Busema who you should be emulating, but actually Symonenko instead?? :-)

'

August 12, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

@ Hack

"Nobody is denying that there was an approximate 15 year period know as 'korenizatisya' used to help enlist the support of the local populace to the bolshevik cause.."

-The Bolsheviks enlisted the help of Ukrainian nationalists (most of them socialist in persuasion) to counter Greater Russian chauvinism as they called it, or otherwise the ideology of the Empire, the old regime. It had nothing to do with winning the hearts and minds of the non-Russians, certainly not in Ukraine, which had a large portion of people who thought of themselves as Russians. Kiev had an overwhelming Russian majority in 1917.

"(bolshevism was imported militarily from the Russian north)"

You have never heard about Donetsk-Krivoy Rog Republic, the Arsenal uprising. The Ukrainian People's Republic was only able to deal with the former with German help. Not to mention its hold on power was tenuous at best, it did not have a vast support.

That wikipedia article is seriously flawed. Helping yourself by quoting wikipedia articles, probably edited by some Canadian freak, won't cut it. Russian becoming compulsory was not Russification but common sense in rapidly industrialising USSR. The education remained in the native tongue. The purges, and accusations made during them are not relevant to the actual state of things. Russian schools reappeared in Ukraine only with liberalisation under Khrushchev, and many Ukrainian writers and intellectuals were not purged but continued to serve the regime as before.

August 13, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

'-The Bolsheviks enlisted the help of Ukrainian nationalists (most of them socialist in persuasion) to counter Greater Russian chauvinism as they called it, or otherwise the ideology of the Empire, the old regime. It had nothing to do with winning the hearts and minds of the non-Russians, certainly not in Ukraine, which had a large portion of people who thought of themselves as Russians. Kiev had an overwhelming Russian majority in 1917.'

The 'Ukrainian nationalists' that you allude to were not enlisted, as you indicate, but coopted with the threat of extinction if they didn't play along with the new regime. The Ukrainian movement was in full swing by the time the commies form the north invaded Ukraine. Wwhat was going on within the periophery of Ukraine, however, should not be mistaken for what waas going on in Kyiv and the central Ukraine, where massive support for the Directory and the UNR cannot be disputed.

'It had nothing to do with winning the hearts and minds of the non-Russians, certainly not in Ukraine, which had a large portion of people who thought of themselves as Russians. Kiev had an overwhelming Russian majority in 1917.'

For the life of me, I can't understsand how anybody could comeup with one like this (lol Leos). Either too much Busema or too much cannabis
(probably both!)........

'Russian becoming compulsory was not Russification but common sense in rapidly industrialising USSR.

You call it what you want Leos ('common sense' - bologne!), I'll call it what it was: RUSSIFICATION

'

August 13, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

@ Hack

But it can be disputed. Honestly, let us remember the so called Battle of Kruty, so celebrated by the nationally conscious. Hrushevsky and Vynychenko were unable to send anyone but a handful of cadets there. If these clowns had massive support, they would have thousands of volunteers. And by the way, the Bolsheviks they were fighting did not arrive from the North, but from Khar'kov.

Go and look at the census of 1917, Ukrainians were 9% in Kiev. ;-)

Russian being made compulsory was though of as developing workforce that could be moved around the whole of USSR, otherwise the rest of the classes remained in Ukrainian. Hardly Russification in my book.

Buzina, Cannabis, or whatever, at least I do not rely on poorly written, poorly argued nonsense from wikipedia.

August 13, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Look at your last two comments Leos - you've not disputed or even addressed one single point brought up in my quotation from Wikipedia. Put on your glasses and take a good look! :-) :-)

August 13, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

@ Hack

But I think I did, you are simply not smart enough to see that. ;-)

August 13, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Off topic but the new Red Dawn film finally has a new trailer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDLEeAzIbwc

August 14, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterjack

Well actually, your commnents are directed towards my commnents, not the Wikepidia source I quote...'I think'...:-)

Is there anything in the actual Wikipedia quotation that you lambast as 'probably edited by some Canadian freak,' that you find inaccurate or objectionable??

August 14, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

@ Hack

Read my comments above again, I have no desire to repeat my self.

August 14, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

Up kinda late tonight Leos?....must be putting the finishing touches on yet another piece debunking svido-srachism...can't hardly wait for tomorrow's edition (do you write or think about anythig other than svido-srachism??....what would the world do without your insightful
commentary (what would I do??) Keeping the world safe from svido-srachism,,,what a 'career'! :-) :-)

August 14, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterLaughing Hack

An interesting clip that puts into question your preposterous theories of the Polish/Austrian genesis of the Ukrainian language Leos....The speaker makes it clear that the vernacular language used in Kyiv shared a great deal in common with the modern Ukrainian language, as evidenced from 11-13 th century grafiti found within St. Sophia's Cathedral. Not only nouns, but interestingly enough grammatical endings too. Of course, the author points out that the literary language was mostly based on Church Slavonic, as in Bulgaria and Serbia too (he could have also added Russia). (Perhaps it was Czartoryski's and Chaikovsky's distant relatives that actually concocted the Ukrainian language,eh Leos?) :-) :-) :-) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=By97WtKBe58&feature=player_embedded

August 14, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

@ Hack

Yes indeed, basic regional forms that this man in the video presents, and that have survived to this day, existed. But Ukrainian language itself was heavily influenced by Polish nevertheless. Most of what the man in the video reads is Eastern Slavic in nature. But here are Polish borrowings in Ukrainian:

http://russian.kiev.ua/bookread.php?id=20

More than 500 of them in this brief summary. Many of them are modern terms...Besides that, the video is too weak to prove the antiquity of Ukrainian.

August 14, 2012 | Registered CommenterLeoš Tomíček

'...Besides that, the video is too weak to prove the antiquity of Ukrainian.'

You're quite right Leos, this clip in and of itself does not prove the 'antiquity' of the Ukrainian language. No, as the moderator here often refers to the pioneering work of Agafangel Krimsky who worked in this field, I find it much more reliable and satisfying than anything that you've presented here...(Czartoryski, Busema, etc;) :-) :-).........!

August 15, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterHistorical Hack

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